Thursday, December 6, 2007

Snow Birds Part 2

Like many people, I've spent most of my life being so busy that I didn't have time, or rather didn't take the time, to really observe the little creatures around my home. In fact, it wasn't until I began to enjoy the hobby of photography that I truly observed things up close, I mean really up close.

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For many years I've enjoyed the Birds and Bloom magazine for the photographs, I have stacks of these magazines that I've picked up at garage sales. I always wanted to take decent pictures of birds and flowers too, but it takes a lot of money for really good camera equipment. A few months ago I was able to purchase a zoom lens for my camera and I love it. I love being able to zoom in close to see the colorful details of the birds that I would have otherwise missed.

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Today I went out to fill the bird feeders and noticed that the finches didn't fly away while I was walking about. When I checked the finch feeder the birds stayed just a few branches above my head. I went inside to get the thistle seed and my camera. When I got back outside, I started taking pictures and slowly took a step closer with each picture, I was able to get pretty close before they flew off.

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While I was filling the thistle feeder this one flew just a few feet away to wait. I love being able to see the colors and tiny little details on this finch.
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The dark-eyed juncos remind me of the hummingbirds because they are so feisty and stingy with their stash of food. This one, (above) was really letting the other junco have it for getting too close to his birdseed.

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The dark-eyed juncos are beautiful birds but are very difficult to photograph since you can't see their dark eyes. It really, really bugs me not being able to see their eyes.

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The cardinals were back briefly today. The female is easier to photograph because she sits still longer; the male grabs a seed and quickly flies away.

Coopers-Hawk

Lisa said yesterday, "With all your bird activity you will probably have a Cooper's Hawk show up."

Guess what, Lisa, I spotted a Coopers hawk this afternoon sitting on the roof top of my back yard neighbors house. It was watching my bird feeder. It must have already eaten because it never gave chase, just watched and then quietly flew away.

I thought I was finished with bird watching until spring, but I've actually had more bird activity than before. I thought they would have all flown south by now. I guess some of them stick around for these cold snowy Indiana winters. Crazy birds.

10 comments:

mon@rch said...

Such wonderful pictures of those birdies around your feeders! I love your thistle bags and I just love my bag! Keep up the great work and glad you captured that coopers hawk!

Robin's Nesting Place said...

Hi Mon@rch, thank you for stopping by. I have a nicer thistle feeder but they won't use it, they prefer the bags. Mine are starting to a bit weathered. I'd like to see what kind you have.

Lisa at Greenbow said...

Robin, I am so glad you got to see the Cooper's Hawk. I bet he gets a meal from your smorgasbord at some point especially if you have mourning doves coming in to your feeders. I don't think the Coop is all that picky tho.

Another bird I wanted to mention to you is the Common Redpoll. If you have a field guide you might take a look at the Common Redpoll. They are a finch and they are not real common most years but up your way they are showing up at feeders quite a bit. They look similar to House Finches but they appear more dainty and are colored a bit different. I won't bore you with details. You can look it up if you want to. Good Luck. I would turn a flip if one showed up at our house. At least I would think about it I would probably break something if I tried to do a flip. ;)

MrBrownThumb said...

Great photo Robin. I like the second bird the best because he seems to be staring right back at you.

shirl said...

Hi again, Robin :-)

Fantastic photos yet again! Oh I do love to see the photos of the birds in your garden. I agree completely that it isn't until you use the zoom lens you really see their detail!

Yes, the chattering and activity in your garden will attract the hawks and perhaps cats too. I have bamboos and other plants around my feeders so both can't swoop in to catch the birds too easily :-)

Well, Robin I have to say that this is exactly the time of year that I know my posts will be predominately on the birds. I began my blog posting on them. I now I have a better camera and a zoom lens too and I am really looking forward to using it in the snow after seeing your photos :-D

I really look forward to seeing many more winter shots of the birds in your garden. The garden is less cluttered now and it is a great opportunity to see the birds on tree branches and shrubs as well as on the feeders.

Layanee at 'Ledge and Gardens' said...

You have done such a beautiful job with these pictures! I enjoyed the snow pictures also and you are right about how magical it makes the world seem.

verobirdie said...

Robin, those pictures are really beautiful, both of the birds and of the snow. Thanks you so much for those eyecandies.

Bek said...

Your pictures are wonderful! They look like out of dreams, and not reality.

Blackswamp_Girl said...

The hawk was doing recon! :) I have had a few visit my feeders as well, and Lisa's right--they do like the mourning doves and the pigeons. Mostly because they're big and slow.

It's so cool to see the hawks swoop in, though. I love that!

Mr. McGregor's Daughter said...

A zoom lens makes all the difference in wildlife photos. Yours are great!