Wednesday, March 26, 2008

I'm Sure You'll Understand Dirt Envy

Today is a lovely day with highs in the mid-fifties. I have a few of my windows open and have been enjoying listening to the birds. I sat outside on the patio for a little while and decided I was in the mood to work on a neighborhood project.

I live beside the neighborhood playground and this is what it has looked like for the last several years. I decided to join my Home Owners Association this year rather than being extremely frustrated and angry because certain things weren't getting done. I am now the person who is responsible for seeing that things get done in this common area. As of last night's meeting, I now have approval to order the mulch. I wanted to remove the weeds before the mulch came rather than have someone come out and spray weed killer on the children's play area, (which had been planned).


So, I went out and started pulling the very weeds that have been the source of much frustration. (Man, did that ever feel good!). The ground was perfect for weeding, not too wet and not too dry. Even the dandelions popped right out of the ground. It wasn't long before I discovered why the weeds are so prolific in this area and why they came up so easily. It has the most loamy soil, a perfect dark rich well composted soil, from the years of mulch and leaves breaking down. I'm sure that very few people can imagine dirt envy, but I'm sure you all will understand perfectly. What I wouldn't give to garden in dirt like that rather than the hard clay I have. I think maybe this is where my topsoil may have gone. Anyway, I'm planning a flower bed in another part of the common area and I'll be asking for permission to move this to that area rather than buying the dirt and amendments as planned. I'll still add some manure but this should work beautifully.

The robins aren't having any trouble finding worms. I watched this one for a while and it had a feast. Well, I must get back to work. I'd love to get that weeding job finished today.

14 comments:

Vanillalotus said...

Wow that is wonderful dirt! Interesting what you uncover at of areas that aren't cared for. I'm sure you'll make it a wonderful space!

Connie said...

That sounds like some ambitious projects.. but rewarding as well.

Carol said...

I definitely undestand dirt envy! If that play area was never dug up for a house, then it is very possible the top soil there was left alone. It's great you are working to improve the appearance of your neighborhood!

Carol, May Dreams Gardens

Lisa at Greenbow said...

Way to go Robin!! Kudos to you for taking the bull by the horns. We too take care of an anbandoned lot beside our house. The city owns it but doesn't take care of it which means they didn't mow it but once or twice per summer. UGH We do mow it regularly. Years ago we tried to get Ducks Unlimited or some such organization to sow wildflowers,grasses etc here. But we had neighbors that didn't like that look so, we mow. My DB has started an Arboretum there. He planted about 8 trees last summer. They are all sticks. I hope they take.

Leslie said...

I live in a small rural county of central Kansas. Volunteers are the backbone of getting community jobs accomplished. Sounds like you have found a great project.
Good Luck!

Brenda Kula said...

Our robins don't look like that one. Perhaps we have different robins. Good for you for creating beauty wherever you can. I do understand dirt envy. I truly do!
Brenda

Melanie said...

Even the photo showed how lovely that dirt is. I'm surprised at how workable the soil is this early in the year. It's the same thing here, perfect to dig in.

Mary said...

I'm sure the dirt is good for weeding and planting. We have red clay...

I give you much credit for volunteering to head a committe that requires others to work. Sometimes, I find that everyone on a committee like yours is so enthusiastic until the real work begins. I'm experiencing it now with our wildlife habitat on the campus where I work.

Keep at 'em, Robin!

Amy said...

Hooray for keeping weed killer away from the playground :)

Yes, I can most definitely relate to "dirt envy". My parents have beautiful soil now, but it took more than twenty years to get to where they are today. I have many memories of picking out the never-ending rocks, and they've been adding compost for years and years.

beckie said...

So this is the project you were sowing extra seeds for. Good for you. Rather than be a whiner, you are being a doer! You'll have to document each step for us.

Yolanda Elizabet said...

It's not fair is it, that the best soil is in the play area and not in your garden. I do understand dirt envy very well as I garden on heavy clay too. ;-)

But good for you that you decided to join and get things done! Many people just complain and do nothing.

Brenda Kula said...

Robin, I am not at all offended by your words. They were very supportive. (I've already commented on this post, but wanted to add this after I read yours). I have forgiven. I couldn't have done anything else. I harbor no hate. I know she must have been ill in a way I didn't understand. I'm always here if you want to talk too. You can always email me from my blog. Brenda

Frances, said...

Robin, you are inspiring to us all, by doing something about a problem that bothered you. Hope they give you free rein to do what you like, it will be a benefit to everyone. Love that you tackled those weeds by hand, so gratifying and avoiding the chemicals at the same time. Well done.
Frances at Faire Garden

Tera Rose said...

Dirt envy? LOL I understand. We solved our dirt problem. Someone told us to plant rye grass in October and to let it grow. We tilled it in this past month and can not believe how much life is in our garden beds!

It was very inexpensive and it really worked!

Not to mention, we saw green all winter!

Check to see if in your climate area it will work.